Global Health Data Exchange - Discover the World's Health Data

IHME Data

Download datasets created by IHME for our research projects and publications. You can learn more about our research and publications on our website


Data made available for download on IHME Websites can be used, shared, modified or built upon by non-commercial users in accordance with the IHME FREE-OF-CHARGE NON-COMMERCIAL USER AGREEMENT. For more information (and inquiries about commercial use), visit IHME Terms and Conditions.


The dataset contains estimates of incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for interventions for HIV/AIDS, malaria, syphilis, and tuberculosis in 128 countries. Estimates are based on meta-regression analysis of ICERs. Data used in the meta-regression analysis are ICERs studies in the Tufts University’s cost-effectiveness analysis registry for 128 countries and subnational regions that are eligible for Global Fund support.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2021 (GBD 2021), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories and selected subnational locations.

This dataset provides air pollution exposure estimates for nitrogen dioxide pollution, ozone pollution, ambient particulate matter pollution, and household air pollution. Population-weighted exposure summary files are provided for all air pollution risk factors, and gridded exposure files are provided for nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and ambient particulate matter pollution.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2021 (GBD 2021), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories and selected subnational locations.

Estimates of 15 dietary risks and the burden attributable to these were produced for 1990-2021. Files available in this record include estimates of the daily intake of the 15 GBD food groups (either in grams or percent energy) by location, year, age, and sex. Estimates of disease burden attributable to dietary risks are available through the GBD Results Tool.

Researchers at IHME and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) conducted a systematic review and bias assessment of all primary data on measles seroprevalence in low- and middle-income countries published from 1962-2021. 

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2021 (GBD 2021), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories.

This dataset provides annual estimates for summary exposure values (SEVs), deaths, years of life lost (YLLs), years lived with disability (YLDs), disability adjusted life years (DALYs), life expectancy, healthy life expectancy and life expectancy decomposition for 2022-2050. Data sources used to produce the estimates came from GBD 2019 and GBD 2021 analyses.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2021 (GBD 2021), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories and selected subnational locations.

Covariates, which are independent variables with a positive or negative relationship to GBD diseases and conditions, are used to inform the estimation process in models in all components and stages of the GBD study. Types of covariates used include socioeconomic, demographic, health system access, climate, and food consumption. This dataset contains data for covariates for 1980-2021 used in the GBD 2021 study.

Get Data Files

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2021 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2021 (GBD 2021), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories and selected subnational locations.

Annual estimates for deaths, DALYs, YLLs, and YLDs attributable to 88 risk factors, as well as estimates for summary exposure values (SEVs) by risk, are available from the GBD Results Tool. Estimates are available by age and sex for 1990-2021. Select tables and a supplementary results appendix published in The Lancet in May 2024 in "Global burden and strength of evidence for 88 risk factors in 204 countries and 811 subnational locations, 1990–2021: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2021" are also available for download via the link below.

Get data files

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2021 (GBD 2021), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories and selected subnational locations.

Developed by GBD researchers and used to help produce these estimates, the Socio-demographic Index (SDI) is a composite indicator of development status strongly correlated with health outcomes. It is the geometric mean of 0 to 1 indices of total fertility rate under the age of 25 (TFU25), mean education for those ages 15 and older (EDU15+), and lag distributed income (LDI) per capita. As a composite, a location with an SDI of 0 would have a theoretical minimum level of development relevant to health, while a location with an SDI of 1 would have a theoretical maximum level.

This dataset provides tables with SDI values for all estimated GBD 2021 locations for 1950–2021, as well as 2021 location quintile and reference SDI quintile values.

Research by the Global Burden of Disease Health Financing Collaborator Network produced estimates for Gross Domestic Product (GDP) from 1960-2050. Estimates are reported as GDP per person in constant 2022 purchasing-power parity-adjusted (PPP) dollars. 

Research by the Global Burden of Disease Health Financing Collaborator Network produced retrospective health spending estimates for 1995-2022 for 204 countries and territories. The estimates cover total health spending, health spending disaggregated by source into three domestic financing source categories (government, out-of-pocket, and prepaid private), and development assistance for health (DAH). Domestic health spending source data came primarily from the WHO’s Global Health Expenditure Database (GHED). DAH data came from a diverse set of sources, including program reports, budget data, national estimates, and National Health Accounts (NHAs). The resulting estimates were used to forecast GDP and prospective health spending estimates for 2022-2050. Estimates are reported in constant 2022 United States Dollars, constant 2022 purchasing power parity adjusted (PPP) dollars, and as a percent of gross domestic product.

Research by the Global Burden of Disease Health Financing Collaborator Network produced projected health spending estimates for 2022-2050 for 204 countries and territories. The estimates cover total health spending, health spending disaggregated by source into three domestic financing source categories (government, out-of-pocket, and prepaid private), and development assistance for health (DAH). Retrospective health spending estimates for 1995-2022 and key covariates (including GDP per capita, total government spending, total fertility rate, and fraction of the population older than 65 years) were used to forecast GDP and health spending through 2050. Estimates are reported in constant 2022 US dollars, constant 2022 purchasing-power parity-adjusted (PPP) dollars, and as a percent of gross domestic product.

Development Assistance for Health (DAH) on COVID-19 produced estimates for 2020-2023, which are based on project databases, financial statements, annual reports, IRS 990s, and correspondence with agencies. The DAH Database enables comprehensive analysis of trends in international disbursements of grants and loans for COVID-19-related health projects in low- and middle-income countries from key agencies. The data are disaggregated by source of funds, channel of funding, country and geographic region, and program areas.

This version of the Development Assistance for Health (DAH) Database includes estimates for 1990-2023, which are based on project databases, financial statements, annual reports, IRS 990s, and correspondence with agencies. The DAH Database enables comprehensive analysis of trends in international disbursements of grants and loans for health projects in low- and middle-income countries from key agencies. The data are disaggregated by source of funds, channel of funding, country and geographic region, health focus areas, and program areas.

To better understand the data and how to use it, please refer to the IHME DAH Database 2023 User Guide.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2021 (GBD 2021), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories and selected subnational locations.

Disability weights, which represent the magnitude of health loss associated with specific health outcomes, are used to calculate years lived with disability (YLD) for these outcomes in a given population. The weights are measured on a scale from 0 to 1, where 0 equals a state of full health and 1 equals death. This table provides disability weights for the 440 health states (including combined health states) used to estimate nonfatal health outcomes for the GBD 2021 study.

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2021 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2021 (GBD 2021), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories and selected subnational locations.

These tables contain International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes, for both ICD-9 and ICD-10, mapped to GBD 2021 causes of death and nonfatal causes.

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2021 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2021 (GBD 2021), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories and selected subnational locations.

This set of files contain the following for GBD 2021: the cause hierarchy; the risk, impairment, etiology, and injury n-code (REI) hierarchy; and locations hierarchies. The GBD Locations Hierarchy file contains only GBD locations, including subnational locations for which results were released at the time of the study's publication. The All Locations Hierarchies file also includes hierarchies for other regions for which estimates were produced, such as WHO and World Bank regions. These files allow users to filter for sets of values by level or parent category, including cause or risk group, GBD super region or region, or custom region.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2021 (GBD 2021), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories and selected subnational locations.

Annual estimates for prevalence, incidence, years lived with disability (YLDs), and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) are available from the GBD 2021 Results Tool. Estimates are available by age and sex for 1990-2021.

Select tables and a supplementary results appendix published in "Global incidence, prevalence, years lived with disability (YLDs), disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 371 diseases and injuries in 204 countries and territories and 811 subnational locations, 1990–2021: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2021" are available for download from this record.

Get data files

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2019 coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories and selected subnational locations. The Global Burden of Antimicrobial Resistance (GRAM) estimates the burden of pathogens, infectious syndromes and antimicrobial resistance.

This dataset includes disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) associated with 85 pathogens in 2019, globally, regionally, and for 204 countries and territories.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2021 (GBD 2021), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories and selected subnational locations.

This dataset includes estimates of the burden associated with lower respiratory infection (LRI) and LRI pathogens for Global Burden of Disease Study (GBD) countries in 1990, 2019, 2020, and 2021. Input data for the overall LRI mortality model came from the cause of death (CoD) database. The CoD database contains several types of data sources, five of which are used in estimation of LRI: vital registration (VR), verbal autopsy (VA), sample vital registration (VR-S), surveillance, and minimally invasive tissue sample (MITS) diagnoses. 

This dataset contains retrospective estimates for the cost of informal care attributable to dementia in the United States of America from 2010 to 2019 and prospective cost estimates in 2030, 2040, and 2050 under both low and high growth scenarios. Retrospective estimates are provided for the US national level, each US state, and the District of Columbia. Prospective estimates are provided for the US national level only. Final estimates include both the replacement and forgone wage costs attributable to dementia per dementia case. The replacement cost model estimates how much it would cost to replace all informal caregiving with formal, paid caregivers. The forgone wage cost model estimates how much income is lost for informal caregivers by caring for a person living with dementia instead of working for a wage. All cost estimates are reported in 2019 United States dollars.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2021 (GBD 2021), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories and selected subnational locations.

Annual estimates for cause-specific mortality will be available from the GBD Results Tool. Estimates are available by age and sex for 1990-2021. Select tables and a supplementary results appendix published in The Lancet in April 2024 in "Global burden and hotspots of 288 causes of death and life-expectancy decomposition in 204 countries and territories and 811 subnational locations, 1990-2021" are also available for download via the link below.

Get Data Files

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2021 (GBD 2021), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories and selected subnational locations.

This dataset provides annual estimates for age-specific fertility rate (ASFR), total fertility fate (TFR) and live births for 1950-2100. Data sources used to produce the estimates came from 8709 country-years of vital and sample registrations, 1455 surveys and censuses, and 150 other sources.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2021 (GBD 2021), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories and selected subnational locations.

This dataset includes estimates of the burden associated with all-form tuberculosis for Global Burden of Disease Study (GBD) countries between 1990 and 2021. Tuberculosis mortality was informed by vital registration, verbal autopsy, sample-based vital registration, and mortality surveillance data. Tuberculosis morbidity data included annual case notifications, data from prevalence surveys, and estimated cause specific mortality (CSMR) of TB among HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2021 (GBD 2021), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories and selected subnational locations.

This dataset includes annual estimates for number and rates of stillbirth at ≥ 20 and ≥ 28 weeks gestation from 1990-2021. For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2021 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2021 (GBD 2021), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 204 countries and territories and selected subnational locations.

Annual estimates for fertility, population, migration, and all-cause mortality will be available from the GBD 2021 Results Tool (forthcoming May 2024). Estimates will be available by age and sex for 1950-2021. Select tables published in The Lancet in March 2024 in "Global age-sex-specific mortality, life expectancy, and population estimates in 204 countries and territories and 811 subnational locations, 1950–2021, and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic: a comprehensive demographic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2021" are also available for download via the “Files” tab above.

Liver cancer mortality rate estimates were produced at the county level in the United States, and by racial and ethnic population, for each year between 2000-2019. These estimates were generated using population and deaths data from the National Center for Health Statistics.

This dataset includes the following:

  • CSV files of county-, state-, and national-level estimates of liver cancer mortality rates for each age group, sex, year, and racial and ethnic population (non-Latino and non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native [AIAN], non-Latino and non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander [Asian], non-Latino and non-Hispanic Black [Black], Latino or Hispanic [Latino], and non-Latino and non-Hispanic White [White]). Blank cells are for masked estimates
  • Code used to generate the estimates

Researchers systematically reviewed, identified, and extracted data from cohort, case-control, and Mendelian randomization studies published between 1970 and 2021 that estimated the association between alcohol consumption and risk of ischemic heart disease. In total, 124 unique studies were included. Relative risk curves for the association between alcohol consumption and ischemic heart disease were estimated using data from cohort and case-control studies separately and in combination, and from Mendelian randomization studies using the Burden of Proof meta-analytic framework.

Estimates were produced for family planning for women ages 15-49 years at the 5x5 km-level in Burkina Faso, Kenya, and Nigeria from 2000-2020. They were produced using data from 65 population-based household surveys conducted in Africa between 2000 and 2020 that included information on contraception use and fertility, and subnational geographical location for women 15-49 years.

This dataset includes:

  • GeoTIFF raster files for pixel-level estimates of CPR (contraceptive prevalence), mCPR (modern contraceptive prevalence), tCPR (traditional contraceptive prevalence), unmet need (unmet need for contraception), met need (met need for contraception with modern methods), and intent (intent to use contraception in the future)
  • CSV files of aggregated estimates at the country level and the first and second administrative divisions
  • Code files used to generate the estimates

Get Data Files

Researchers at IHME and the Centre for Global Health Inequalities Research (CHAIN) at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effect of education on all-cause adult mortality. Mixed-effects meta-regression models were implemented to address heterogeneity in referent and exposure measures among studies and to adjust for study-level covariates. 17 094 unique records were identified, 603 of which were eligible for analysis and included data from 70 locations in 59 countries, producing a final dataset of 10 355 observations. Education showed a dose–response relationship with all-cause adult mortality, with an average reduction in mortality risk of 1·9% per additional year of education. The effect was greater in younger age groups than in older age groups, and researchers found no differential effect of education on all-cause mortality by sex or sociodemographic index level.

Researchers at IHME and the University of Oxford estimated deaths, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), years lived with disability (YLDs), and years of life lost (YLLs) associated with and attributable to bacterial antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in 88 pathogen-drug combinations for the WHO Region of Africa and for 35 countries in 2019. Data gathered to inform these estimates included multiple cause of death data, hospital discharges, minimally invasive tissue sampling, systematic literature reviews, and microbiology lab results from hospitals and national and multi-national surveillance systems, totaling 343 million individual records or isolates and 11,361 study-location-years collected. These data informed 8 modelling components which were combined with results from GBD 2019 to estimate AMR burden. Estimates were produced for two counterfactual scenarios: no infection and drug-susceptible infection.

This dataset includes total cardiovascular disease burden estimates globally for multiple cardiovascular diseases for 7 Global Burden of Disease Study (GBD) super regions, 21 GBD regions, 204 countries and territories, and select subnational locations. The following are reported: mortality by age and sex for the years 1990-2022; age-standardized mortality in 2022 by Socio-Demographic Index (SDI), a composite indicator of fertility, income, and education; all ages and age-standardized prevalence for 2022; and age-standardized disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for 2022. The dataset also includes burden attributable to selected risk factors for each GBD region in 2022, as measured by DALYs. These data are custom calculated for publication in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and will not be available in the GBD 2022 Results Tool.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the region. The SMI health facility survey is designed to assess facility conditions, evaluate service provision and utilization, and measure quality of care. Patient medical records are examined to evaluate facilities’ treatment practices retrospectively over the course of the evaluation period. Health facility data collection aims to capture changes produced by interventions at the level of the health services access point, which may foretell changes in population health outcomes.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the region. The SMI health facility survey is designed to assess facility conditions, evaluate service provision and utilization, and measure quality of care. Patient medical records are examined to evaluate facilities’ treatment practices retrospectively over the course of the evaluation period. Health facility data collection aims to capture changes produced by interventions at the level of the health services access point, which may foretell changes in population health outcomes.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the region. The SMI health facility survey is designed to assess facility conditions, evaluate service provision and utilization, and measure quality of care. Patient medical records are examined to evaluate facilities’ treatment practices retrospectively over the course of the evaluation period. Health facility data collection aims to capture changes produced by interventions at the level of the health services access point, which may foretell changes in population health outcomes.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the region. The SMI health facility survey is designed to assess facility conditions, evaluate service provision and utilization, and measure quality of care. Patient medical records are examined to evaluate facilities’ treatment practices retrospectively over the course of the evaluation period. Health facility data collection aims to capture changes produced by interventions at the level of the health services access point, which may foretell changes in population health outcomes.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the region. The SMI household survey captures household characteristics, reported maternal and child health data for women 15-49 years of age and for children 0-59 months of age, and anthropometric measurements including height, weight, and hemoglobin concentration for children. Community data collection via household surveys permits the measurement of changes in health status, access to health care, and satisfaction with health care, as well as an array of data points which give context to these factors.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the region. The SMI household survey captures household characteristics, reported maternal and child health data for women 15-49 years of age and for children 0-59 months of age, and anthropometric measurements including height, weight, and hemoglobin concentration for children. Community data collection via household surveys permits the measurement of changes in health status, access to health care, and satisfaction with health care, as well as an array of data points which give context to these factors.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the region. The SMI household survey captures household characteristics, reported maternal and child health data for women 15-49 years of age and for children 0-59 months of age, and anthropometric measurements including height, weight, and hemoglobin concentration for children. Community data collection via household surveys permits the measurement of changes in health status, access to health care, and satisfaction with health care, as well as an array of data points which give context to these factors.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the  region. The SMI community survey carried out in Belize covers eligible women’s background characteristics, access to health care, fertility preferences, and knowledge and use of contraceptive methods (including barriers to use). Women who have been pregnant in the last two years answer questions about birth history; antenatal, delivery, and postpartum care; breastfeeding; and infant feeding practices. Caretakers of children aged 0-5 years are asked detailed questions for each child under age 5 on topics such as child’s current health status, recent history of illness, immunization, and supplementation history.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the region. The SMI health facility survey is designed to assess facility conditions, evaluate service provision and utilization, and measure quality of care. Patient medical records are examined to evaluate facilities’ treatment practices retrospectively over the course of the evaluation period. Health facility data collection aims to capture changes produced by interventions at the level of the health services access point, which may foretell changes in population health outcomes.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the region. The SMI health facility survey is designed to assess facility conditions, evaluate service provision and utilization, and measure quality of care. Patient medical records are examined to evaluate facilities’ treatment practices retrospectively over the course of the evaluation period. Health facility data collection aims to capture changes produced by interventions at the level of the health services access point, which may foretell changes in population health outcomes.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the region. The SMI health facility survey is designed to assess facility conditions, evaluate service provision and utilization, and measure quality of care. Patient medical records are examined to evaluate facilities’ treatment practices retrospectively over the course of the evaluation period. Health facility data collection aims to capture changes produced by interventions at the level of the health services access point, which may foretell changes in population health outcomes.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the region. The SMI health facility survey is designed to assess facility conditions, evaluate service provision and utilization, and measure quality of care. Patient medical records are examined to evaluate facilities’ treatment practices retrospectively over the course of the evaluation period. Health facility data collection aims to capture changes produced by interventions at the level of the health services access point, which may foretell changes in population health outcomes.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the region. The SMI health facility survey is designed to assess facility conditions, evaluate service provision and utilization, and measure quality of care. Patient medical records are examined to evaluate facilities’ treatment practices retrospectively over the course of the evaluation period. Health facility data collection aims to capture changes produced by interventions at the level of the health services access point, which may foretell changes in population health outcomes.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the region. The SMI health facility survey is designed to assess facility conditions, evaluate service provision and utilization, and measure quality of care. Patient medical records are examined to evaluate facilities’ treatment practices retrospectively over the course of the evaluation period. Health facility data collection aims to capture changes produced by interventions at the level of the health services access point, which may foretell changes in population health outcomes.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the  region. The SMI health facility survey is designed to assess facility conditions, evaluate service provision and utilization, and measure quality of care. Patient medical records are examined to evaluate facilities’ treatment practices retrospectively over the course of the evaluation period. Health facility data collection aims to capture changes produced by interventions at the level of the health services access point, which may foretell changes in population health outcomes.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the  region. The SMI household survey captures household characteristics, reported maternal and child health data for women 15-49 years of age and for children 0-59 months of age, and anthropometric measurements including height, weight, and hemoglobin concentration for children. Community data collection via household surveys permits the measurement of changes in health status, access to health care, and satisfaction with health care, as well as an array of data points which give context to these factors.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the  region. The SMI household survey captures household characteristics, reported maternal and child health data for women 15-49 years of age and for children 0-59 months of age, and anthropometric measurements including height, weight, and hemoglobin concentration for children. Community data collection via household surveys permits the measurement of changes in health status, access to health care, and satisfaction with health care, as well as an array of data points which give context to these factors.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the  region. The SMI household survey captures household characteristics, reported maternal and child health data for women 15-49 years of age and for children 0-59 months of age, and anthropometric measurements including height, weight, and hemoglobin concentration for children. Community data collection via household surveys permits the measurement of changes in health status, access to health care, and satisfaction with health care, as well as an array of data points which give context to these factors.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) is a regional public-private partnership that brings together Mesoamerican governments, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors with the purpose of reducing health inequalities affecting the poorest 20 percent of the population in the  region. The SMI household survey captures household characteristics, reported maternal and child health data for women 15-49 years of age and for children 0-59 months of age, and anthropometric measurements including height, weight, and hemoglobin concentration for children. Community data collection via household surveys permits the measurement of changes in health status, access to health care, and satisfaction with health care, as well as an array of data points which give context to these factors.

Pages

GHDx: IHME Data Subscribe