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IHME Data

Download datasets created by IHME for our research projects and publications. You can learn more about our research and publications on our website

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Data made available for download on the GHDx can be used, shared, modified, or built upon by non-commercial users via the Open Data Commons Attribution License. For more information (and inquiries about commercial use), visit IHME Terms and Conditions.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a follow-up health facility survey conducted in two provincial-level regions in Panama: Emberá-Wounaan and Guna Yala. In total, 39 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a follow-up health facility survey conducted in five departments in Nicaragua. In total, 60 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a follow-up health facility survey conducted in seven departments in Honduras. In total, 60 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a follow-up health facility survey conducted in the departments of Huehuetenango and San Marcos in Guatemala. In total, 60 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a follow-up health facility survey conducted in eight departments in El Salvador. In total, 60 facilities were surveyed. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a health facility survey conducted in the socioeconomic regions of Huetar Atlántica and Brunca in Costa Rica. In total, 60 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a follow-up health facility survey conducted in three districts in Belize: Cayo, Corozal, and Orange Walk. In total, 38 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a follow-up health facility survey conducted in the state of Chiapas in Mexico. In total, 60 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline school survey conducted in the provinces of Limón and Puntarenas in Costa Rico. The survey was conducted in a randomly selected sample of 41 secondary schools: high schools, technical schools, and night schools. The target sample for the survey was 1,000 students. Within each school, all sections in 7th-11th grades were eligible to be selected for the survey, and a section from each eligible grade was randomly selected to participate. Students completed a self-administered questionnaire which captured knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to the sexual and reproductive health of school students, as well as contact with reproductive health services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline health facility survey conducted in eight departments in El Salvador. In total, 65 facilities were surveyed. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline health facility survey conducted in two provincial-level regions in Panama: Emberá-Wounaan and Guna Yala. In total, 38 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline health facility survey conducted in five departments in Nicaragua. In total, 64 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline health facility survey conducted in nine departments in Honduras. In total, 90 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline health facility survey conducted in the departments of Huehuetenango and San Marcos in Guatemala. In total, 93 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline health facility survey conducted in three districts in Belize: Cayo, Corozal, and Orange Walk. In total, 39 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline health facility survey conducted in the state of Chiapas in Mexico. In total, 90 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline household census and baseline household survey conducted in two provincial-level indigenous regions, or comarcas, in Panama: Emberá-Wounaan and Guna Yala. The census captured basic demographic characteristics of all usual household occupants and was used to produce a sample of households containing eligible women (ages 15-49) and children (ages 0-59 months) for the household survey. In the household survey, any household heads and all eligible women were interviewed. Information was collected on additional demographic characteristics; healthcare use, access, and expenditures; and perceived quality of key interventions for women of reproductive age and children. Height, weight, and anemia measurements were taken for children under age 5.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline household census and baseline household survey conducted in five departments in Nicaragua, in both intervention and control areas. The census captured basic demographic characteristics of all usual household occupants and was used to produce a sample of households containing eligible women (ages 15-49) and children (ages 0-59 months) for the household survey. In the household survey, any household heads and all eligible women were interviewed. Information was collected on additional demographic characteristics; healthcare use, access, and expenditures; and perceived quality of key interventions for women of reproductive age and children. Height, weight, and anemia measurements were taken for children under age 5. Dried blood spot (DBS) measurements were taken for children ages 12-23 months.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline household census and baseline household survey conducted in nine departments in Honduras. The census and survey were conducted in both intervention and control areas. The census captured basic demographic characteristics of all usual household occupants and was used to produce a sample of households containing eligible women (ages 15-49) and children (ages 0-59 months) for the household survey. In the household survey, any household heads and all eligible women were interviewed. Information was collected on additional demographic characteristics; healthcare use, access, and expenditures; and perceived quality of key interventions for women of reproductive age and children. Height, weight, and anemia measurements were taken for children under 5.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline household census and baseline household survey conducted in eight departments in El Salvador. The census captured basic demographic characteristics of all usual household occupants and was used to produce a sample of households containing eligible women (ages 15-49) and children (ages 0-59 months) for the household survey. In the household survey, any household heads and all eligible women were interviewed. Information was collected on additional demographic characteristics; healthcare use, access, and expenditures; and perceived quality of key interventions for women of reproductive age and children. Height, weight, and anemia measurements were taken for children under age 5.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline household census and baseline household survey conducted in the departments of Huehuetenango and San Marcos in Guatemala. The census and survey were conducted in both intervention and control areas. The census captured basic demographic characteristics of all usual household occupants and was used to produce a sample of households containing eligible women (ages 15-49) and children (ages 0-59 months) for the household survey. In the household survey, any household heads and all eligible women were interviewed. Information was collected on additional demographic characteristics; healthcare use, access, and expenditures; and perceived quality of key interventions for women of reproductive age and children. Height, weight, and anemia measurements were taken for children under age 5.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline survey of women of reproductive age conducted in three districts in Belize: Cayo, Corozal, and Orange Walk. The survey employed a Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) methodology. The target sample size was 350 women. In half of the sample locations selected, eligible women (ages 15-49) were interviewed through convenience samples taken in public spaces such as markets and town centers. In the other half of the locations, all eligible women were interviewed at randomly selected households. Information was collected on demographic characteristics; healthcare access and use; and perceived quality of key interventions for women of reproductive age and children.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline household census and baseline household survey conducted in the state of Chiapas in Mexico, in both intervention and control areas. The census captured basic demographic characteristics of all usual household occupants and was used to produce a sample of households containing eligible women (ages 15-49) and children (ages 0-59 months) for the household survey. In the household survey, any household heads and all eligible women were interviewed. Information was collected on additional demographic characteristics; healthcare use, access, and expenditures; and perceived quality of key interventions for women of reproductive age and children. Height, weight, and anemia measurements were taken for children under age 5. Dried blood spot (DBS) measurements were taken for children ages 12-23 months.

As part of an analysis of the availability and quality of birth registration data worldwide, researchers from IHME and the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health compiled publicly available birth registration records into a novel birth registration database. They acquired 4,918 country-years of data from 145 countries covering the period 1948-2015. Data were collected from the United Nations Statistical Division (UNSD) database, Eurostat, and directly from national statistical offices and ministry of health databases. For each country-year, this database contains the number of registered live births by age of the mother, sex of the newborn, birth order, and birthweight. Results of the analysis were published in December 2018 in Population Health Metrics in "How useful are registered birth statistics for health and social policy? A global systematic assessment of the availability and quality of birth registration data."

As part of a study to inform plans to achieve Universal Health Coverage (UHC), IHME research generated estimates on utilization and unit cost of outpatient visits and inpatient admissions, and estimated the additional services and funds needed to meet a UHC standard for utilization. Using 1175 country-years of outpatient and 2068 of inpatient data, utilization per person estimates were produced for outpatient visits and inpatient admissions by age and sex for 195 countries and territories for 1990-2016. Data from 795 National Health Accounts (NHAs) were used to produce cost per outpatient visit and inpatient admission estimates for 188 countries for 1995-2016. UHC standards of utilization per disability-adjusted-life-year (DALY) based on existing health systems were created to estimate the additional services and funding needed annually to expand health coverage for countries in 2016. Results of the study were published in The Lancet in December 2018.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 (GBD 2016), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Estimates for incidence, prevalence, deaths, years of life lost (YLLs), years lived with disability (YLDs), and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for tuberculosis by age and sex for 1990-2016 are available from the GBD 2016 Results Tool. Information about the input sources used to produce these estimates is available in the GBD 2016 Data Input Sources Tool. Files available in this record web tables published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Global, regional, and national burden of tuberculosis, 1990–2016: results from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors 2016 Study."

IHME researchers leveraged data from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study to produce life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality forecasts for 195 countries and territories from 2016-2040. In addition to reference scenarios, alternative “better” and “worse” scenarios were produced. Estimates for life expectancy at birth, and deaths and years of life lost (YLLs) for 250 causes by cause, age, and sex are available from GBD Foresight. Estimates for deaths and YLLs attributable to each GBD risk factor and summary exposure values (SEV) by risk are also available. Select tables published in The Lancet in October 2018 in "Forecasting life expectancy, years of life lost, and all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 250 causes of death: reference and alternative scenarios for 2016–40 for 195 countries and territories" are available for download in this record.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

This dataset includes full and abridged life tables with estimates for life expectancy and probability of death by location, single calendar year, age, and sex for 1950-2017. Full life tables contain estimates by single year of age. Abridged life tables contain estimates by 5-year age group. Locations covered include both GBD locations and special regions such as World Bank Income Levels. Data used to produce these tables came from vital registration (VR) systems, sample registration systems, household surveys, censuses, disease surveillance, and demographic surveillance systems (DSS).

Download life table files

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

This dataset provides annual age-specific fertility rate (ASFR) estimates by 5-year age groups for the 10-54 year range for 1950-2017. Data sources used to produce these estimates came from 7,149 location-years of vital registration data, 467 surveys reporting complete birth histories, and 677 surveys and censuses reporting summary birth histories.

Results of an analysis related to these data were published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Population and fertility by age and sex for 195 countries and territories, 1950–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease 2017.”

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2017 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Annual population estimates by single year of age and sex for 1950-2017 are available here. Annual age-specific fertility rate (ASFR) estimates by 5-year age groups in the 10-54 year range for 1950-2017 are available here. Available for download in this record, via the “Files” tab above, are select tables published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Population and fertility by age and sex for 195 countries and territories, 1950–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease 2017.”

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2017 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors from 1990 to 2017.

The United Nations established, in September 2015, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which specify 17 universal goals, 169 targets, and 232 indicators leading up to 2030. Drawing from GBD 2017, this dataset provides estimates on progress for 41 health-related SDG indicators for 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2017, and projections, based on past trends, for 2018 to 2030. Estimates are also included for the health-related SDG index, a summary measure of overall performance across the health-related SDGs.

The results were published in a research article in The Lancet in November 2018.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Estimates for deaths, YLLs, YLDs, and DALYs attributable to 84 risk factors by age and sex as well as estimates for summary exposure values (SEVs) by risk are available from the GBD Results Tool for 1990-2017. Select tables published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 84 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks, 1990–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017" are also available for download via the “Files” tab above.

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2017 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Estimates for disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) by cause, age, and sex for 359 causes and healthy life expectancy (HALE) by age and sex are available from the GBD Results Tool for 1990-2017. Select tables published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 359 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 195 countries and territories, 1990–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017" are also available for download via the “Files” tab above.

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2017 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Estimates for incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) are available from the GBD Results Tool. Estimates are available by age and sex for 354 causes for 1990-2017. Select tables published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 354 diseases and injuries for 195 countries and territories, 1990–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017" are also available for download via the “Files” tab above.

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2017 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Cause-specific mortality estimates for deaths and years of life lost (YLLs) are available from the GBD Results Tool. Estimates are available by age and sex for 282 causes for 1990-2017. Select tables published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Global, regional, and national age-sex-specific mortality for 282 causes of death in 195 countries and territories, 1980–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017" are also available for download via the “Files” tab above.

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2017 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Estimates of life expectancy and all-cause mortality, including under-5 mortality, are available from the GBD Results Tool. Estimates are available by age, sex, and location for 1990-2017. Select tables published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Global, regional, and national age-sex-specific mortality and life expectancy, 1950–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017” are also available for download via the “Files” tab above.

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2017 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Covariates, which are independent variables with a positive or negative relationship to GBD diseases and conditions, are used to inform the estimation process in models in all components and stages of the GBD study. Types of covariates used include socioeconomic, demographic, health system access, climate, and food consumption. This dataset contains data for 334 covariates for 1980-2017 used in the GBD 2017 study.

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The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Developed by GBD researchers and used to help produce these estimates, the Socio-demographic Index (SDI) is a composite indicator of development status strongly correlated with health outcomes. It is the geometric mean of 0 to 1 indices of total fertility rate under the age of 25 (TFU25), mean education for those ages 15 and older (EDU15+), and lag distributed income (LDI) per capita. As a composite, a location with an SDI of 0 would have a theoretical minimum level of development relevant to health, while a location with an SDI of 1 would have a theoretical maximum level.

This dataset provides tables with SDI values for all estimated GBD 2017 locations for 1950–2017 and groupings by location based on their 2017 values.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

This dataset provides population estimates by the following for 1950-2017: location; single calendar year; single year of age, 5-year age group, and select custom aggregate; and sex. Data sources used to produce these estimates came from 1,257 censuses and 761 population registry location-years.

Results of an analysis related to these data were published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Population and fertility by age and sex for 195 countries and territories, 1950–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease 2017.”

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2017 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Disability weights, which represent the magnitude of health loss associated with specific health outcomes, are used to calculate years lived with disability (YLD) for these outcomes in a given population. The weights are measured on a scale from 0 to 1, where 0 equals a state of full health and 1 equals death. This dataset provides disability weights for the 234 unique health states used to estimate nonfatal health outcomes for the GBD 2017 study. The data were published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 354 diseases and injuries for 195 countries, 1990–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017."

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

This set of files contain the following for GBD 2017: the cause hierarchy; the risk, impairment, etiology, and injury n-code (REI) hierarchy; and locations hierarchies. The GBD Locations Hierarchy file contains only GBD locations, including subnational locations for which results were released at the time of the study's publication. (Locations will be added as additional subnational results are released.) The All Locations Hierarchies file also includes hierarchies for other regions for which estimates were produced, such as WHO and World Bank regions. These files allow users to filter for sets of values by level or parent category, including cause or risk group, GBD super region or region, or custom region.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries. These tables contain International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes, for both ICD-9 and ICD-10, mapped to GBD 2017 causes of death and nonfatal causes.

IHME and collaborating researchers conducted a study to map the global distribution of genotypes of bacterial strains that cause tuberculosis disease and examine whether any epidemiologically relevant clinical characteristics were associated with those genotypes. They performed a systematic review to create a comprehensive dataset of human TB molecular epidemiology studies that used representative sampling techniques. Data were extracted and synthesized from 206 studies that reported prevalence of bacterial genotypes (representing over 200,000 bacterial isolates collected over 27 years in 85 countries) and from 34 studies that reported clinical characteristics associated with those genotypes. This dataset contains the following: a screening sheet detailing all studies reviewed; raw genotype distribution data extracted in the systematic review; raw genetic clustering data extracted; and sheets containing MTBC genotype conversions for all genotyping methods included in this study.

Research by IHME and the Department of Health Surveillance, Brazil Ministry of Health produced estimates for age-standardized mortality rates by Brazil municipality for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. The estimates were generated using de-identified death records from the Brazil Mortality Information System (SIM); case notification data from the Brazil national notification system (SINAN); standardization of vital registration of data based on GBD 2016 methodology; and the application of small area estimation models.

This dataset provides estimates for age-standardized mortality rates by cause and sex at the state level and the municipality level for each state for 2001-2015. Study results were published in BMC Medicine in September 2018 in "Progress toward eliminating TB and HIV deaths in Brazil, 2001–2015: a spatial assessment."

Estimates were produced for the prevalence and incidence of diarrhea and diarrhea-related mortality among children younger than 5 years of age at the 5x5 km-level in 52 countries in Africa between 2000-2015. These estimates were produced using data on diarrhea and geographical locations from censuses, several household survey series, including the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) and Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS), and other country‐specific surveys.

This dataset includes the following:

  • GeoTIFF raster files for pixel-level estimates of diarrhea prevalence, incidence of severe diarrheal episodes, diarrhea-related mortality, annualized rates of change for severe incidence and diarrheal mortality, and the probability that a unit will reach GAPPD goals for the reduction of incidence and mortality for given years
  • CSV files of aggregated estimates for each country at the first and second administrative divisions
  • Code files used to generate the estimates

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 (GBD 2016), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Estimates for alcohol use and the burden attributable to this risk factor were produced by sex, age group, and year for 195 countries and territories for 1990-2016. Estimates for alcohol-attributable deaths and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) are available from the GBD Results Tool. Files available in this record include estimates of the prevalence of current drinking, abstention, and the population average of standard drinks daily. Study results were published in The Lancet in August 2018 in "Alcohol use and burden: a systematic analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 for 195 countries and territories, 1990–2016."

Human capital, widely recognized as the level of education and health in a population, is considered an important determinant of economic growth. IHME generated a measure of expected human capital, defined for each birth cohort as the expected years lived from 20 to 64 years of age adjusted for educational attainment, learning or education quality, and functional health status using period-age-and-sex-specific rates. Learning estimates are based on student performance on math, science, and reading assessments. Functional health status is comprised of the prevalence of seven conditions with proven links to productivity and learning.

This dataset includes estimates for the following five measures by age and sex for 195 countries from 1990-2016: expected human capital; average years of educational attainment, from 0-18 years; learning, the average standardized test score transformed to a 0 to 1 scale; health, transformed to a 0 to 1 scale; and survival, or expected years lived between ages 20-64.

Contemporary range maps for 278 medically important snake species and estimates of the populations most vulnerable to snakebite envenoming were produced. Existing expert opinion range (EOR) maps, occurrence data, and a multivariate environmental similarity analysis were used to generate the contemporary range maps. These data were triangulated with geographical accessibility surfaces, the HAQ Index (a measure of healthcare access and quality), and information on antivenom availability to identify vulnerable populations.

This dataset includes: shapefiles for the range maps and vulnerable population counts; GeoTIFF files at the 5x5 km-level for venomous snake species ranges, vulnerable population hotspots, and travel time to major cities in snake species ranges; and CSV files for vulnerable populations at the admin 2-level.

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The Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 (GBD 2016), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Estimates for deaths, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), years lived with disability (YLDs), years of life lost (YLLs), prevalence, and incidence for 29 cancer groups by age and sex for 1990-2016 are available from the GBD Results Tool. Files available in this record are the web tables published in JAMA Oncology in June 2018 in "Global, Regional, and National Cancer Incidence, Mortality, Years of Life Lost, Years Lived With Disability, and Disability-Adjusted Life-years for 29 Cancer Groups, 1990 to 2016."

Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 (GBD 2016) estimates were used in an analysis of personal healthcare access and quality for 195 countries and territories, as well as selected subnational locations, over time. This dataset includes the following global, regional, national, and selected subnational estimates for 1990-2016: age-standardized risk-standardized death rates from 24 non-cancer causes considered amenable to healthcare; age-standardized mortality-to-incidence ratios for 8 cancers considered amenable to healthcare; and the Healthcare Access and Quality (HAQ) Index and individual scores for each of the 32 causes on a scale of 0 to 100. Code used to produce the estimates is also included.

Results were published in The Lancet in May 2018 in "Measuring performance on the Healthcare Access and Quality Index for 195 countries and territories and selected subnational locations: a systematic analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016."

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