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IHME Data

Download datasets created by IHME for our research projects and publications. You can learn more about our research and publications on our website


Terms and Conditions of Data Use:

Data made available for download on the GHDx can be used, shared, modified, or built upon by non-commercial users via the Open Data Commons Attribution License. For more information (and inquiries about commercial use), visit IHME Terms and Conditions.


Estimates were produced for lower respiratory infection (LRI) incidence, prevalence, and mortality among children under 5 at the 5x5 km-level in 52 countries in Africa between 2000-2017. These estimates were produced using data extracted from 191 household surveys that had questions about the prevalence of cough with difficulty breathing among children under 5, and allowed for subnational geolocation. The surveys include the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS), World Bank, and other country‐specific surveys. Collectively, they provided 56,628 total data points, corresponding to 53,592 survey clusters and 3,036 subnational polygon boundaries.

This dataset includes the following:

  • GeoTIFF raster files for pixel-level estimates of LRI incidence, prevalence, and mortality
  • CSV files of aggregated estimates for each country at the zero, first, and second administrative divisions
  • Code files used to generate the estimates

Annual estimates were produced for mortality probability and death counts in three age groups – neonates (0-28 days old), infants (under-1 year old), and under-5 (0-5 years old) – at the 5x5 km-level in 99 low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) between 2000-2017. These estimates were produced using data on child mortality and geographical locations from censuses and several household survey series. Survey sources used include the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) and UNICEF Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) series, and other country‐specific surveys.

This dataset includes the following:

  • GeoTIFF raster files for pixel-level estimates of mortality probability and death counts in 3 age bins
  • CSV files of aggregated mortality probability and death count estimates for each country at the zero, first, and second administrative divisions, by age group
  • Code files used to generate the estimates

Country profiles were created for 43 sub-Saharan African countries highlighting travel times to the most accessible health facility from areas with Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) spillover event potential, travel times to the nearest at-risk location for VHFs, and an assessment of how travel times would change given new infrastructure in a country.

This dataset includes the following:

  • Three PDF files per country
    • Country-specific estimates of the travel times described above
    • Maps of the analysis stratified by facility type
    • Maps depicting the uncertainty around the modeled VHF spillover event potential estimates using differing thresholds
  • One PDF of tables of the travel times to the nearest at-risk location for any VHF from all hospitals in a country
  • Code files used to generate the estimates

Get Data Files

This dataset contains 882 unique occurrences of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) extracted from 217 reports published between October 2012 and February 2018. Occurrences of MERS-CoV among humans, mammals, and environmental sources were extracted and geopositioned to the highest resolution possible (up to 5x5km). Special attention was given to spillover events (i.e., humans becoming infected from mammals). Thus, MERS-CoV occurrences meeting the criteria for index or unspecified cases are assigned their own rows; alternatively, multiple mammal, import, or secondary cases are collapsed to one row in the dataset.

IHME researchers participated in study that applied statistical mapping techniques to the most extensive database of dengue case locations to date to predict global environmental suitability for the virus as of 2015. The database was created with published literature, case reports, and informal online sources, with usable location information extracted from each source. The final occurrence database contains 13,604 unique occurrences, which represent a unique location where one or more dengue cases occurred within one year.

The database includes the following:

  • A dengue occurrence point dataset, which contains precise point locations where dengue has occurrence in the past
  • A dengue occurrence polygon dataset, which contains small administrative units within which dengue has occurred in the past
  • Other disease background points, which contains point locations where other non-dengue infectious diseases have occurred in the past

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

This reference life table is used in GBD to calculate years of life lost (YLLs) due to premature mortality. It was constructed based on the lowest observed age-specific mortality rates by location and sex across all estimation years from all locations with populations over 5 million in 2016. YLLs are computed by multiplying the number of estimated deaths by the reference life table’s life expectancy at age of death. The table includes estimates for life expectancy at age x for ages 0 to 110+ at five-year intervals.

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2017 Data Resources page.

Research by the Global Burden of Disease Health Financing Collaborator Network estimated HIV/AIDS spending for 137 low- and middle-income countries for 2000-2016. The estimates cover HIV/AIDS spending disaggregated by source into three domestic financing source categories (government, out-of-pocket, and prepaid private) and development assistance for health (DAH). Spending is also disaggregated by function, including care and treatment, prevention, and other spending. Domestic HIV/AIDS spending by source and function was estimated based on five major data sources: the AIDSinfo online database, Global Fund concept notes and proposals, National Health Accounts (NHAs), National AIDS Spending Assessments, and the AIDS data hub. Development assistance for HIV/AIDS data were drawn from IHME's 2018 Development Assistance for Health Database. Estimates are reported in constant 2018 United States dollars.

Research by the Global Burden of Disease Health Financing Collaborator Network produced projected health spending estimates for 2017-2050 for 195 countries and territories. The estimates cover total health spending, and health spending disaggregated by source into three domestic financing source categories (government, out-of-pocket, and prepaid private) and development assistance for health (DAH). Retrospective health spending estimates for 1995-2016 and key covariates (including GDP per capita, total government spending, total fertility rate, and fraction of the population older than 65 years) were used to forecast GDP and health spending through 2050. Estimates are reported in constant 2018 US dollars, constant 2018 purchasing-power parity-adjusted (PPP) dollars, and as a percent of gross domestic product.

Research by the Global Burden of Disease Health Financing Collaborator Network produced retrospective health spending estimates for 1995-2016 for 195 countries and territories. The estimates cover total health spending, and health spending disaggregated by source into three domestic financing source categories (government, out-of-pocket, and prepaid private) and development assistance for health (DAH). Domestic health spending source data came primarily from the WHO’s Global Health Expenditure Database (GHED). DAH data came from a diverse set of sources, including program reports, budget data, national estimates, and National Health Accounts (NHAs). The resulting estimates were used to help produce prospective health spending estimates for 2017-2050. Estimates are reported in constant 2018 United States dollars, constant 2018 purchasing-power parity-adjusted (PPP) dollars, and as a percent of gross domestic product.

This version of the Development Assistance for Health (DAH) Database includes estimates for 1990-2018, which are based on project databases, financial statements, annual reports, IRS 990s, and correspondence with agencies. The DAH Database enables comprehensive analysis of trends in international disbursements of grants and loans for health projects in low- and middle-income countries from key agencies. The data are disaggregated by source of funds, channel of funding, country and geographic region, health focus areas, and program areas. New in 2018: the addition of China as a source of funding; the inclusion of the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations and European Economic Area as channels of disbursements; and the addition of drug resistance/antimicrobial resistance (AMR) as a program area.

To understand the framework used to track DAH, users of the database should review IHME's Financing Global Health 2018 report and methods annex.

Research by the IHME estimated malaria spending for 106 countries which were malaria-endemic over 2000-2016 or became malaria-free after 2000. The estimates cover malaria spending disaggregated by source into three domestic financing source categories (government, out-of-pocket, and prepaid private) and development assistance for health (DAH). Domestic malaria spending estimates were produced from a diverse set of data, including National Malaria Control Programs, the WHO’s World Malaria Reports (WMRs), country spending estimates reported to the Global Fund, and National Health Accounts (NHAs). Development assistance for malaria data were drawn from IHME's 2018 Development Assistance for Health Database. This database is also informed by a diverse set of sources, including program reports, budget data, national estimates, and NHAs. Estimates are reported in constant 2018 United States dollars.

Estimates were produced for exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) prevalence among infants under 6 months of age at the 5x5 km-level in 49 countries in Africa between 2000-2017. These estimates were produced using data extracted from 188 household surveys that had complete records of questions relating to infant feeding and geographical information. The surveys include the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS), and country‐specific and other multinational surveys.

This dataset includes the following:

  • GeoTIFF raster files for pixel-level estimates of EBF prevalence
  • CSV files of aggregated estimates for each country at the zero, first, and second administrative divisions
  • Code files used to generate the estimates

Estimates were produced for diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DPT) vaccine coverage and dropout for children ages 12-23 months at the 5x5 km-level in 52 countries in Africa between 2000-2016. These estimates were produced using data from 183 population-based household surveys conducted in Africa between 2000 and 2016 that included dose-specific information on DPT coverage (from vaccine cards or maternal recall in the absence of vaccine cards) and subnational geographical location for children ages 12-59 months.

This dataset includes the following:

  • GeoTIFF raster files for pixel-level estimates of DPT1 coverage (the proportion of children who received one or more doses of DPT), DPT3 coverage (three or more doses), and relative and absolute DPT1-3 dropout
  • CSV files of aggregated estimates for each country at the first and second administrative divisions
  • Code files used to generate the estimates

Estimates were produced for HIV prevalence among adults ages 15-49 and the corresponding number of people living with HIV (PLHIV) at the 5x5 km-level in 47 countries in Africa between 2000-2017. These estimates were produced using data on HIV and geographical locations from seroprevalence surveys and sentinel surveillance of antenatal care clinics.

This dataset includes the following:

  • GeoTIFF raster files for pixel-level estimates of HIV prevalence, PLHIV, and eight covariates constructed for the analysis: prevalence of male circumcision, self-reported STI symptoms, marriage or living with a partner as married, one’s current partner living elsewhere, condom use at last sexual encounter, reported intercourse among young adults, and multiple partners in the last year for men and for women
  • CSV files of aggregated HIV prevalence and PLHIV estimates for each country at the zero, first, and second administrative divisions
  • Code files used to generate the estimates

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a follow-up health facility survey conducted in two provincial-level regions in Panama: Emberá-Wounaan and Guna Yala. In total, 39 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a follow-up health facility survey conducted in five departments in Nicaragua. In total, 60 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a follow-up health facility survey conducted in seven departments in Honduras. In total, 60 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a follow-up health facility survey conducted in the departments of Huehuetenango and San Marcos in Guatemala. In total, 60 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a follow-up health facility survey conducted in eight departments in El Salvador. In total, 60 facilities were surveyed. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a health facility survey conducted in the socioeconomic regions of Huetar Atlántica and Brunca in Costa Rica. In total, 60 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a follow-up health facility survey conducted in three districts in Belize: Cayo, Corozal, and Orange Walk. In total, 38 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a follow-up health facility survey conducted in the state of Chiapas in Mexico. In total, 60 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline school survey conducted in the provinces of Limón and Puntarenas in Costa Rico. The survey was conducted in a randomly selected sample of 41 secondary schools: high schools, technical schools, and night schools. The target sample for the survey was 1,000 students. Within each school, all sections in 7th-11th grades were eligible to be selected for the survey, and a section from each eligible grade was randomly selected to participate. Students completed a self-administered questionnaire which captured knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to the sexual and reproductive health of school students, as well as contact with reproductive health services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline health facility survey conducted in eight departments in El Salvador. In total, 65 facilities were surveyed. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline health facility survey conducted in two provincial-level regions in Panama: Emberá-Wounaan and Guna Yala. In total, 38 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline health facility survey conducted in five departments in Nicaragua. In total, 64 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline health facility survey conducted in nine departments in Honduras. In total, 90 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline health facility survey conducted in the departments of Huehuetenango and San Marcos in Guatemala. In total, 93 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline health facility survey conducted in three districts in Belize: Cayo, Corozal, and Orange Walk. In total, 39 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline health facility survey conducted in the state of Chiapas in Mexico. In total, 90 facilities were surveyed. These represent facilities that provide ambulatory-, basic-, and complete-level Essential Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EONC) services. Surveyors collected data through interviews with facility personnel and direct observation. They recorded information on general facility characteristics, infrastructure, staff, supplies, equipment, and the availability of key maternal and child health care services. They also performed medical record reviews, extracting retrospective data on record-keeping, family planning, treatment practices related to uncomplicated births and medical complications experienced by mothers or infants during delivery, and child medical services.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline household census and baseline household survey conducted in two provincial-level indigenous regions, or comarcas, in Panama: Emberá-Wounaan and Guna Yala. The census captured basic demographic characteristics of all usual household occupants and was used to produce a sample of households containing eligible women (ages 15-49) and children (ages 0-59 months) for the household survey. In the household survey, any household heads and all eligible women were interviewed. Information was collected on additional demographic characteristics; healthcare use, access, and expenditures; and perceived quality of key interventions for women of reproductive age and children. Height, weight, and anemia measurements were taken for children under age 5.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline household census and baseline household survey conducted in five departments in Nicaragua, in both intervention and control areas. The census captured basic demographic characteristics of all usual household occupants and was used to produce a sample of households containing eligible women (ages 15-49) and children (ages 0-59 months) for the household survey. In the household survey, any household heads and all eligible women were interviewed. Information was collected on additional demographic characteristics; healthcare use, access, and expenditures; and perceived quality of key interventions for women of reproductive age and children. Height, weight, and anemia measurements were taken for children under age 5. Dried blood spot (DBS) measurements were taken for children ages 12-23 months.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline household census and baseline household survey conducted in nine departments in Honduras. The census and survey were conducted in both intervention and control areas. The census captured basic demographic characteristics of all usual household occupants and was used to produce a sample of households containing eligible women (ages 15-49) and children (ages 0-59 months) for the household survey. In the household survey, any household heads and all eligible women were interviewed. Information was collected on additional demographic characteristics; healthcare use, access, and expenditures; and perceived quality of key interventions for women of reproductive age and children. Height, weight, and anemia measurements were taken for children under 5.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline household census and baseline household survey conducted in eight departments in El Salvador. The census captured basic demographic characteristics of all usual household occupants and was used to produce a sample of households containing eligible women (ages 15-49) and children (ages 0-59 months) for the household survey. In the household survey, any household heads and all eligible women were interviewed. Information was collected on additional demographic characteristics; healthcare use, access, and expenditures; and perceived quality of key interventions for women of reproductive age and children. Height, weight, and anemia measurements were taken for children under age 5.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline household census and baseline household survey conducted in the departments of Huehuetenango and San Marcos in Guatemala. The census and survey were conducted in both intervention and control areas. The census captured basic demographic characteristics of all usual household occupants and was used to produce a sample of households containing eligible women (ages 15-49) and children (ages 0-59 months) for the household survey. In the household survey, any household heads and all eligible women were interviewed. Information was collected on additional demographic characteristics; healthcare use, access, and expenditures; and perceived quality of key interventions for women of reproductive age and children. Height, weight, and anemia measurements were taken for children under age 5.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline survey of women of reproductive age conducted in three districts in Belize: Cayo, Corozal, and Orange Walk. The survey employed a Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) methodology. The target sample size was 350 women. In half of the sample locations selected, eligible women (ages 15-49) were interviewed through convenience samples taken in public spaces such as markets and town centers. In the other half of the locations, all eligible women were interviewed at randomly selected households. Information was collected on demographic characteristics; healthcare access and use; and perceived quality of key interventions for women of reproductive age and children.

The Salud Mesoamérica Initiative (SMI) focuses on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in Mesoamerica. This dataset is the product of an SMI impact evaluation. It includes results of a baseline household census and baseline household survey conducted in the state of Chiapas in Mexico, in both intervention and control areas. The census captured basic demographic characteristics of all usual household occupants and was used to produce a sample of households containing eligible women (ages 15-49) and children (ages 0-59 months) for the household survey. In the household survey, any household heads and all eligible women were interviewed. Information was collected on additional demographic characteristics; healthcare use, access, and expenditures; and perceived quality of key interventions for women of reproductive age and children. Height, weight, and anemia measurements were taken for children under age 5. Dried blood spot (DBS) measurements were taken for children ages 12-23 months.

As part of an analysis of the availability and quality of birth registration data worldwide, researchers from IHME and the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health compiled publicly available birth registration records into a novel birth registration database. They acquired 4,918 country-years of data from 145 countries covering the period 1948-2015. Data were collected from the United Nations Statistical Division (UNSD) database, Eurostat, and directly from national statistical offices and ministry of health databases. For each country-year, this database contains the number of registered live births by age of the mother, sex of the newborn, birth order, and birthweight. Results of the analysis were published in December 2018 in Population Health Metrics in "How useful are registered birth statistics for health and social policy? A global systematic assessment of the availability and quality of birth registration data."

IHME researchers conducted a systematic review of published literature containing data on onchocerciasis-related infection and disability indicators from 1975-2017, encompassing the period of implementation for control and local elimination programs among the Americas, Africa and Yemen. Ultimately, geographic data, as well as relevant epidemiological metadata, were extracted from 259 peer-reviewed sources reporting prevalence of onchocerciasis. This dataset contains the following: a screening sheet detailing all studies reviewed; a database of onchocerciasis prevalence containing 14,043 unique location, diagnostic, age and sex-specific records marked for collapse where a single geo-position is shared between multiple records; and a conversion file that connects the names of diagnostics extracted and standardized during the review to diagnostic codes and diagnostic groups.

As part of a study to inform plans to achieve Universal Health Coverage (UHC), IHME research generated estimates on utilization and unit cost of outpatient visits and inpatient admissions, and estimated the additional services and funds needed to meet a UHC standard for utilization. Using 1175 country-years of outpatient and 2068 of inpatient data, utilization per person estimates were produced for outpatient visits and inpatient admissions by age and sex for 195 countries and territories for 1990-2016. Data from 795 National Health Accounts (NHAs) were used to produce cost per outpatient visit and inpatient admission estimates for 188 countries for 1995-2016. UHC standards of utilization per disability-adjusted-life-year (DALY) based on existing health systems were created to estimate the additional services and funding needed annually to expand health coverage for countries in 2016. Results of the study were published in The Lancet in December 2018.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 (GBD 2016), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Estimates for incidence, prevalence, deaths, years of life lost (YLLs), years lived with disability (YLDs), and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for tuberculosis by age and sex for 1990-2016 are available from the GBD 2016 Results Tool. Information about the input sources used to produce these estimates is available in the GBD 2016 Data Input Sources Tool. Files available in this record web tables published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Global, regional, and national burden of tuberculosis, 1990–2016: results from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors 2016 Study."

IHME researchers leveraged data from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study to produce life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality forecasts for 195 countries and territories from 2016-2040. In addition to reference scenarios, alternative “better” and “worse” scenarios were produced. Estimates for life expectancy at birth, and deaths and years of life lost (YLLs) for 250 causes by cause, age, and sex are available from GBD Foresight. Estimates for deaths and YLLs attributable to each GBD risk factor and summary exposure values (SEV) by risk are also available. Select tables published in The Lancet in October 2018 in "Forecasting life expectancy, years of life lost, and all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 250 causes of death: reference and alternative scenarios for 2016–40 for 195 countries and territories" are available for download in this record.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

This dataset includes full and abridged life tables with estimates for life expectancy and probability of death by location, single calendar year, age, and sex for 1950-2017. Full life tables contain estimates by single year of age. Abridged life tables contain estimates by 5-year age group. Locations covered include both GBD locations and special regions such as World Bank Income Levels. Data used to produce these tables came from vital registration (VR) systems, sample registration systems, household surveys, censuses, disease surveillance, and demographic surveillance systems (DSS).

Download life table files

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

This dataset provides annual age-specific fertility rate (ASFR) estimates by 5-year age groups for the 10-54 year range for 1950-2017. Data sources used to produce these estimates came from 7,149 location-years of vital registration data, 467 surveys reporting complete birth histories, and 677 surveys and censuses reporting summary birth histories.

Results of an analysis related to these data were published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Population and fertility by age and sex for 195 countries and territories, 1950–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease 2017.”

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2017 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Annual population estimates by single year of age and sex for 1950-2017 are available here. Annual age-specific fertility rate (ASFR) estimates by 5-year age groups in the 10-54 year range for 1950-2017 are available here. Available for download in this record, via the “Files” tab above, are select tables published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Population and fertility by age and sex for 195 countries and territories, 1950–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease 2017.”

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2017 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors from 1990 to 2017.

The United Nations established, in September 2015, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which specify 17 universal goals, 169 targets, and 232 indicators leading up to 2030. Drawing from GBD 2017, this dataset provides estimates on progress for 41 health-related SDG indicators for 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2017, and projections, based on past trends, for 2018 to 2030. Estimates are also included for the health-related SDG index, a summary measure of overall performance across the health-related SDGs.

The results were published in a research article in The Lancet in November 2018.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Estimates for deaths, YLLs, YLDs, and DALYs attributable to 84 risk factors by age and sex as well as estimates for summary exposure values (SEVs) by risk are available from the GBD Results Tool for 1990-2017. Select tables published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 84 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks, 1990–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017" are also available for download via the “Files” tab above.

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2017 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Estimates for disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) by cause, age, and sex for 359 causes and healthy life expectancy (HALE) by age and sex are available from the GBD Results Tool for 1990-2017. Select tables published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 359 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 195 countries and territories, 1990–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017" are also available for download via the “Files” tab above.

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2017 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Estimates for incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) are available from the GBD Results Tool. Estimates are available by age and sex for 354 causes for 1990-2017. Select tables published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 354 diseases and injuries for 195 countries and territories, 1990–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017" are also available for download via the “Files” tab above.

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2017 Data Resources page.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.

Cause-specific mortality estimates for deaths and years of life lost (YLLs) are available from the GBD Results Tool. Estimates are available by age and sex for 282 causes for 1990-2017. Select tables published in The Lancet in November 2018 in "Global, regional, and national age-sex-specific mortality for 282 causes of death in 195 countries and territories, 1980–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017" are also available for download via the “Files” tab above.

For additional GBD results and resources, visit the GBD 2017 Data Resources page.

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