Global Health Data Exchange - Discover the World's Health Data

Series and Systems

Survey families or dataset series are data collection efforts that occurred over a period of time or in several geographic locations, using the same or very similar data collection methodology and instruments. Series may be multinational -- collected in more than one country -- or in a single country. Usually all the datasets in the series are collected with the support of the same institution or institutions, but individual surveys or datasets may have the support or assistance of additional parties. The advantage of series from a research perspective is that often data from a series are more easily comparable than data from a variety of sources.

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The Access, Bottlenecks, Costs, and Equity (ABCE) project is a multipronged and multicountry research collaboration focused on understanding what drives and hinders health service provision.
The Afripop project, started in June 2009, provides detailed population distribution maps for Africa.
Conducted annually, CTUMS has collected information on tobacco use and related issues since 1999.
The World Bank developed the CWIQ survey series as an inexpensive tool to collect information on poverty, including access and satisfaction with social services and social welfare indicators.
The Demographic and Health Survey series, funded in large part by USAID, includes over 240 surveys in over 80 countries, and that number is still growing.
Ongoing survey series on teenager tobacco use
International census microdata from the Minnesota Population Center data project
Italy's "Aspetti della Vita Quotidiana" series annually surveys individuals from approximately 20,000 households on topics concerning their everyday life and behaviors.
The LSMS is a survey series conducted by the World Bank since the 1980s. The surveys generally cover income, expenditures, housing conditions, and household economic activities.
Started in the mid-90s, the MICS surveys from UNICEF are focused on providing data for tracking progress toward the MDGs, particularly those related to health, education and mortality.
The AED NetMark project conducted a series of surveys in African countries, collecting baseline and follow-up data on ITN usage, knowledge and availability.
PAPCHILD surveys were conducted in the 1990s by the League of Arab States in 10 Arab states in the Middle East and North Africa.
A household survey that has regularly collected data on demographics and living conditions since 1995.
A series of surveys done by the World Bank in Africa.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides technical assistance to countries to design and implement national population-based surveys, as well as analyze and use the resulting data to improve reproductive and child health services.
The Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS) is a series of nationally representative surveys designed to monitor the effects of Russian reforms on the health and economic welfare of households and individuals in the Russian Federation.
This survey was conducted to collect information on the health of elderly populations in select Central and Latin American countries.
IDCAP was designed to increase the clinical competence and practice of mid-level practitioners, while providing the global health community with a better understanding of which training methods produce the best and most cost-effective results.
The BRFSS has been conducted in the United States since 1984 to provide state-level data on personal health behaviors related to preventative health care and various health risks.
Currently housed by Princeton, these surveys were originally done under the auspices of the International Statistical Institute from the 70s to the early 80s.
The World Health Organization conducted the World Health Surveys from 2002-2004; the series collected demographic, wealth and health information for 70 countries to provide insight into the functioning of health systems.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides technical assistance to countries to design and implement national population-based surveys, as well as analyze and use the resulting data to improve reproductive and child health services.